5 reasons you should be eating dandelions

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This year has been especially colorful in our backyard.

Yellow, to be exact.

This spring we have had more dandelions that ever.

And we hate the way they look.

But dandelions have been given a bad rap. We all think they are weeds and work very hard to remove them from our yards. Lawn bags across the country are no doubt filled with dead dandelions this year, but did you know that instead of pitching them into the garbage, you could be eating them?

While we complain about the costs of fresh salad greens, we have a plethora of healthy goodness growing free in our yards.

5 Reasons You should be EATING dandelions - nutritious and medicinal powerhouse

Dandelions are highly nutrient dense and contain medicinal qualities as well.

5 reasons you should be eating dandelions

  1. Strengthens your immune system and improves eye health
  2. Protects your heart and lowers blood pressure
  3. Strengthens bones and prevents osteoporosis
  4. Lowers blood sugar levels in diabetics
  5. Detoxes the body and reduces acne and other skin disorders

These are just a small handful of the health benefits of eating dandelions, they are so nutrient dense that the possibilities are endless.

DANDELION NUTRITION
Nutritional data and images courtesy of www.NutritionData.com.

OrganicFacts.net has a great graphic with detailed information about the health benefits of dandelions.

For more information on exactly what to do with the dandelions you pick to eat: how to eat dandelions.

Sources:

  • http://foodfacts.mercola.com/dandelion-greens.html
  • http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2441/2
  • http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-and-supplements/lifestyle-guide-11/supplement-guide-vitamin-a
  • http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2004/03/24/vitamin-k-part-two.aspx
  • http://www.naturalfoodbenefits.com/display.asp?CAT=2&ID=120
  • http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/benefits-of-dandelion-greens-zmaz08amzmcc.aspx#axzz32BFAms5U
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  1. says

    I’ve never thought about eating dandelions. We certainly have a TON of them all over our yard. Good to know if I’m ever trapped at home with nothing to eat, I can just head out to the backyard and start acting like a cow!

  2. says

    I’ve heard great things about dandelion root, but never thought about picking them from my yard. So I just remove the yellow flower and stem and eat the leaves?

  3. says

    I love dandelion greens! Been eating them for years and always let them grow freely in my veggie garden. But this year I’m in the desert, and there aren’t many dandelions here. They only seem to show up where people have forced a lawn to grow; I love the irony. I might just have to start a dandelion garden. Now, won’t that help me make friends with the neighbors?

  4. Rebecca Orr says

    You know, I have never really thought about eating them. But for some reason, I know a few things about how to use them! Lol I know you can use the flower to makes fritters, wine, and you can eat them raw or steamed. As for the leaves, apparently they are great in salads. But if they are bitter, you just boil them for a few minutes and it takes he bitterness away. Although, after boiling them I wouldn’t want them in a fresh salad. Apparently, you can also use the roots. And yes, lots of medicinal uses as well. Also, I have read that they best time to use the leaves is in early spring before the flowers have bloomed (while they are still buds). Despite the health benefits, I am still hesitant to try them. I am just scared of how they will taste. And I don’t really care for greens….beet, collard, etc. so I probably wouldn’t like the leaves. Anyway, I really should try them. I have a yard full!

    • says

      We have a yard full too. I’ve been kind of hesitant as well, but my dad used to eat the leaves and seemed to like them. Maybe one day I’ll get up the nerve to try.

    • says

      You actually just eat the leaves like you would any other kind of greens. The flower can be used for things including medicinal purposes, but that would require some research.